Transparency & Complexity

Taking R. Ewing’s “Eight Qualities of Pedestrian- and Transit-Oriented Design” as a starting point, I examine numbers 4 & 5: transparency & complexity.  Applying these concepts to Nagano’s Chuo-Dori, I demonstrate their usage in describing walkability, and think about ways in which they can be further improved. To start with my conclusions: From a walkability perspective, the key value of complexity lies in preventing walking from … Continue reading Transparency & Complexity

Street Hierarchy: Kitano

The Kitano-ijinkan area is a unique historic neighborhood located in the foothills near Sannomiya Station.  This post covers a neighborhood including parts of Kitano-cho (北野町), Yamamoto-Dori (山本通), and Naka-Yamate-Dori (中山手通). The streets above are highlighted hierarchically as follows: – Magenta:     A pedestrian plaza and shopping street, with high density of tourists. – Cyan:            Single Lane One Way (minimal road width, … Continue reading Street Hierarchy: Kitano

Hierarchy of Japanese Streets (Version 2)

[ the original version is available here ] The transportation structure of Japanese cities can be decomposed into pedestrian and vehicular networks.  In some places they run side-by-side, in other places they overlap, but for the most part, they are completely separate. Organizing the hierarchy in order of pedestrian volume, from greatest to least: Note that vehicular flow is high only in the middle ranks of … Continue reading Hierarchy of Japanese Streets (Version 2)

Additional Readings: Narrow Streets

Related Books/Theses: “Tight Urbanism” by Daniel Tool. “Neo Medieval Urbanism” by Angela Rose Bagnasco   Related Excerpts: 4. Small, tight streets work great, and so do wide streets, if designed right. Walking through the Gothic Quarter, one can’t help but think of everything we see in terms of scale. The tight streets and alleys with high, enclosing building heights that, combined with the street widths, … Continue reading Additional Readings: Narrow Streets